RAILWAY AND INDUSTRIAL HISTORY OF THE SOUTH WEST BLACK COUNTRY

 
   
 

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Welcome to Stourbridge Junction

 

This site is a collection of articles relating to the railways, industry and community of Stourbridge and the surrounding area. Generally these are taken verbatim from publications of the period and reflect my ramblings through the archives of the land, acquisition of historic materials, and my own idiosyncratic judgment of what is interesting.

Stourbridge is a small town in central England, historically located at the edge of rural Worcestershire, but also an industrial center at the southern edge of the Black Country, and since 1974 amalgamated into the Metropolitan Borough of Dudley.

In the 19th century Stourbridge achieved a world wide reputation in certain industries.

Predominant among these were engineering, refractory materials and glass making. From the middle of that century the growth of all local industries were stimulated by the improved transportation brought about by the railways, and eventually they became, in their turn, a major industry and employer within the town.

The downturn in the fortunes of the railways, after World War II, eventually led to the closure of many local lines, and the contraction of its infrastructure at Stourbridge. The rump of this railway system has survived to see better times in the 1990s, and, amazingly, the town still retains two railway stations, at either end of Great Britain's shortest branch line!

With proposals now being made to extend the new Midlands Metro (Light Railway) to Stourbridge, via the nearby Merry Hill Shopping Centre, and the reinstatement of a direct service to London, the future of railways in Stourbridge looks bright indeed.

In addition the construction of Chiltern Railways Light Maintenance Facility might even be regarded as 84F resurrected.

For the latest additions, see the new Site History page