RAILWAY AND INDUSTRIAL HISTORY OF THE SOUTH WEST BLACK COUNTRY

 
 

 

 

 

County Express
incorporating
BRIERLEY HILL, STOURBRIDGE, KIDDERMINSTER & DUDLEY NEWS
SOUTH STAFFORDSHIRE & EAST WORCESTERSHIRE CHRONICLE


No. 126.] SATURDAY, 29th., MAY, 1869 [ PRICE ONE PENNY

District Intelligence
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STOURBRIDGE

THE ADDITIONAL STATION ACCOMODATION. — BOARD OF TRADE INSPECTION. — On Thursday morning Colonel Hutchinson, acting on behalf of the Board of trade visited Stourbridge with reference to the memorial presented to that body for and against the abandonment of the branch railway into Foster Street. A meeting of the Stourbridge Railway Company was held some two or three months ago, when it was resolved to petition the Board of Trade for permission to abandon the construction of the short branch for passenger accommodation into Foster Street, and to substitute for it an improvement of the loop to the bottom of the town with a passenger and goods station there. The Improvement Commissioners at a late meeting adopted a memorial against the abandonment of the Foster Street branch; and after a meeting in London, at which both views on the subject were represented, Colonel Hutchinson, to whom the memorials had been referred, came down to Stourbridge on Thursday in order personally to examine into the merits and de-merits of the two competing sites. Various gentlemen connected with the town and the railway interest were present. Colonel Hutchinson made a tour of localities through which the two branches would run, and examined the proposed station sites. In addition to the Foster Street sites, the attention of Colonel Hutchinson was called to a part of Coventry Street, near the junction with Birmingham Street, as being in the opinion of some gentlemen present preferable to either of the others. Colonel Hutchinson pointed out objections to each of the places referred to. The curves in bringing the line into Foster Street would be bery sharp and difficult and the gradient of even the modified line to the bottom of the town would be very steep. The approach too, the latter was inconvenient owing to the metals crossing the road by which it would be approached, traffic being even now interrupted while truck were passing. The narrowness of the road by which the Foster Street or Coventry Street Station would be approached was also referred to. Colonel Hutchinson said in making his report to the Board of Trade he should embody the results of his investigation, and the conclusion which he thought should be drawn from it, having regard to the general interests of the neighbourhood. Memorials have been presented to Colonel Hutchinson, in favour of the High Street station; from inhabitants of Wordsley, Amblecote, Wollaston, and Lower High Street, and from inhabitants of the township (in addition to the Commissioner’s petition) in favour of the Foster Street station.