RAILWAY AND INDUSTRIAL HISTORY OF THE SOUTH WEST BLACK COUNTRY

 
 

 

 

 

County Express
incorporating
BRIERLEY HILL, STOURBRIDGE, KIDDERMINSTER & DUDLEY NEWS
SOUTH STAFFORDSHIRE & EAST WORCESTERSHIRE CHRONICLE


Vol. 1, No. 25 ] SATURDAY, 22nd., JUNE, 1867 [ Price 1d.

"FATAL ACCIDENT NEAR THE ROUND OAK IRON WORKS :- An inquest was held at the Railway Tavern, Round Oak, on Thursday afternoon, before W.H.Phillips Esq., deputy Coroner, touching the death of Thomas Jones, who met his death on Tuesday last, near the Round Oak Iron Works under circumstances detailed below :- The first witness was Samuel Compton, Labourer, residing in Bank Street, Brierley Hill. He said the deceased was also a labourer, and was about 45 years of age. The accident occurred on Tuesday. The deceased was engaged in repairing the railway near the ironworks belonging to the Earl of Dudley. Some waggons had been off the rails and they were compelled to take the road up. Some waggons were shunted down the line and the witness and another man signalled to him to get out of the way, but he seemed to take no notice, and the buffer of the first waggon of the train of 13 struck him on the hip. The engineman that brought the empty waggons signalled the men to get out of the way. The buffer struck him on the hip. He was knocked down, and the first truck passed over his legs. He only lived a few minutes afterwards. Witness said every precaution was used in moving the waggons. Considered it was purely an accident. - By a Juryman: There were two men on the engine and one on the waggons near the middle of the train. - James Collins, labourer, was next examined. Saw the deceased lying across the metals, and helped to remove him, but did not see the accident. Witness was working near to the place were the accident occurred. Deceased was lying between the waggons. Before he heard the alarm, he heard the danger whistle blow. Deceased was alive when he saw him, but was very much crushed. - W.Wotten, labourer, was next examined. He was working with the deceased repairing the railway. When the trucks came up, he warned Jones, who took no notice. He heard the whistle previously. Witness shouted the engineman to stop as soon as the accident occurred, and he stopped the train as soon as possible. Witness did not see how a safer mode of shunting could be adopted. Had been accustomed to that kind of work for 20 years. This being the whole evidence the jury returned a verdict of 'Accidental Death'."